Anthropomorphic bias found in typically developing children is not found in children with autistic spectrum disorder
Thierry Chaminade, Delphine Rosset, David Da Fonseca, Jessica Hodgins, Christine Deruelle
Sage Journals (February 1, 2015)
teaser

The anthropomorphic bias describes the finding that the perceived naturalness of a biological motion decreases as the human-likeness of a computer-animated agent increases. To investigate the anthropomorphic bias in autistic children, human or cartoon characters were presented with biological and artificial motions side by side on a touchscreen. Children were required to touch one that would grow while the other would disappear, implicitly rewarding their choice. Only typically developing controls depicted the expected preference for biological motion when rendered with human, but not cartoon, characters. Despite performing the task to report a preference, children with autism depicted neither normal nor reversed anthropomorphic bias, suggesting that they are not sensitive to the congruence of form and motion information when observing computer-animated agents’ actions.

Thierry Chaminade, Delphine Rosset, David Da Fonseca, Jessica Hodgins, Christine Deruelle (February 1, 2015). Anthropomorphic bias found in typically developing children is not found in children with autistic spectrum disorder. Sage Journals, 19(2).

@article{Hodgins:2017:DOE,
author={Thierry Chaminade, Delphine Rosset, David Da Fonseca, Jessica Hodgins, Christine Deruelle},
title={Anthropomorphic bias found in typically developing children is not found in children with autistic spectrum disorder},
journal={Sage Journals},
volume={19},
number={2},
year={February 1, 2015},
links={http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1362361313512425}